fibroids

Why are our hormones so imbalanced?

Estrogen Disrupting Chemicals may be to blame... Environmental hormones are so commonplace in modern society that there is no way to completely avoid them. They come from pollutants, hormone-injected meats and dairy foods, plastics, pesticides, and hormone replacement drugs for both sexes. Only in the last ten years has anyone realized how common environmental estrogens are in today’s world. Nearly 40% of the pesticides used in commercial agriculture are suspected hormone disruptors. All of the Earth’s waterways are connected, so chemical pollutants containing environmental hormones reach your food supply wherever you live.

Hormone disrupters can affect your entire endocrine system, including the system of your glands, hormones and cellular receptors in your body. They alter the production and breakdown of your own hormones, and the function of your hormone receptors — disrupting hormone balance at its developmental core. They can compete for hormone receptor sites in the body and bind to them in place of natural hormones, causing fluctuations in your hormonal levels. They are a serious concern for women in early pregnancy because a developing embryo is highly sensitive to estrogen disruptor toxicity.

Hormone imbalance disorders are epidemic through this country. We see hormone imbalance in women’s disorders like PMS, endometriosis and fibroids. Further, women with hysterectomies are only beginning to see the harm that removing delicate glands, or treating fragile hormones with drugs can do. Bone loss is clearly related to hormone imbalance. ). A poorly functioning liver (the liver metabolizes excess estrogen), and a high fat, processed foods diet (excess fat harbors hormones) are almost always implicated.

Environmental estrogens can wreak havoc on male and female fertility.  Multiple exposures to environmental estrogens disrupt conception efforts for both partners, affecting ovulation, and lowering sperm count and viability.

Other women’s diseases associated with long exposure to estrogen mimics in the environment: 1) reproductive organ cancer; 2) breast and uterine fibroids; 3) polycystic ovarian syndrome; 4) endometriosis; 5) PID (pelvic inflammatory disease); 6) gallbladder disease; 7) blood clots, stroke.

Are Hormone Disruptors Impacting You? Signs that you may have estrogen disruption:

  • Breast inflammation and pain that worsens before menstrual periods, usually followed by heavy, painful periods.
  • Weight gain: especially in the hips. Bloating, mood swings, low sex drive or vaginal dryness.
  • Head hair loss/facial hair growth. Dry skin or premature wrinkling.
  • Hot flashes: or early perimenopause.
  • Endometriosis: now linked to dioxin, an airborne hormone disrupter.
  • Breast and uterine fibroid development, ovarian cysts, and pelvic inflammatory disease.
  • Breast, uterine and reproductive organ cancer: up to 60% more DDE, DDT and PCB’s, known estrogen disruptors, in women with breast cancer.
  • Early puberty: nearly half of African-American girls and 15% of Caucasian girls now begin to develop sexually by age 8, a clear indicator of estrogen disruption.

 

Are You At Risk Of Exposure To Estrogen Disruptors? You may be especially exposed if: 1)  you live in a high agricultural area; you eat a high fat diet (fatty areas of your body store pesticides and other agricultural chemicals); 2) you eat hormone-injected dairy foods or meats regularly; 3) you’re on prescription HRT drugs or birth control pills.

To Life-long Health,

Linda Page, Ph.D., Traditional Naturopath

What Causes Endometriosis And Fibroids?

While scientists are still not entirely certain why endometriosis and fibroids develop, here are risk factors to be aware of: Excess Levels of Estrogen / Deficient Progesterone: Excess estrogen fuels abnormal tissue growth and is a direct cause of both fibroids and endometriosis for many women. When estrogen production declines during menopause, fibroids normally go away on their own. However, quite understandably, this isn't nearly soon enough for women who are suffering from the problem.

X-Ray Consequences: Even low dose radiation may mean increased risk for fibroids. Breast tissue is so sensitive that the time between a mammogram and fibroid growth is sometimes as little as three months.

Too Much Caffeine and Commercial Meat: Drinking 4-5 cups of coffee daily increases estrogen, triggering fibroid growth. Research from a 2001 study reported in the journal Fertility and Sterility shows women who consume 500 milligrams of caffeine daily, the equivalent of 4-5 cups of coffee, produce 70% more estrogen in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle than women who consume less than 1 cup of coffee. If you like beef, you should know that Italian research reported in Obsetrics and Gynecology shows while eating red meat doubles the risk of developing uterine fibroids, eating plenty of vegetables cuts fibroid risk in half! Experience with the problem has me convinced that eliminating caffeine and hormone-injected meats can dramatically reduce fibroid problems for many women.

Oral Contraceptives: Feedback I've had from birth control users suggests that even the newest low dose oral contraceptives can cause breast swelling, and aggravate fibroid problems and endometriosis for susceptible women.

Natural Therapies To Balance Hormones for Fibroids & Endometriosis Relief

A low fat, vegetarian diet. What you eat can make a big difference. Breast swelling and painful uterine cramping can be significantly improved within weeks after a change to a low fat, vegetarian diet.

Reduce caffeine. Caffeine from coffee, chocolate and colas can aggravate fibroids. Women with a predisposition to fibroids have a hard time metabolizing caffeine in these forms. Some women report they can consume green or white tea without ill effect.

Rethink high fat dairy foods like cheese, milk, and ice cream. Naturopaths and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine routinely suggest eliminating fatty dairy foods from the daily diet to reduce toxic accumulations like fibroids, fatty tumors, cysts and boils. This diet change by itself can produce amazing fibroid relief. Cultured low fat dairy products like yogurt and kefir, are generally well tolerated.

A short cleanse can really help. A 24 hour vegetable juice diet helps clean out acid wastes and reduce body congestion. Consider the 24 hour cleanse in Linda Page's bestselling book, Healthy Healing 12th Edition: A Guide to Self-Healing For Everyone.

Foods that are high in essential fatty acids (EFAs) are a healthy choice. EFAs are liquid fats that help to metabolize hard, clogging saturated fats that contribute to fibroid growths. EFAs also help maintain hormone balance and reduce inflammation- important for fibroid relief. Sea greens like dulse and nori (also a good source of iodine- a proven fibroid fighter), seafoods, dark greens like spinach, cantaloupe, olive oil and avocado are healthy sources of EFAs.

Add cruciferous veggies like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts. Cruciferous veggies are one of my favorite healing foods. Indole 3 carbinole is the constituent responsible for their bitter flavor. It's a natural antioxidant with powerful anti-tumor activity. Indole 3 carbinole improves estrogen metabolism and the body's ability to eliminate excess estrogen. New tests show that women who eat plenty of vegetables containing indole-3-carbinole may lower their risk of breast cancer. Indole 3 carbinole vegetables may also reduce fibroid symptoms by improving estrogen metabolism.

More fiber in your diet is a natural estrogen balancer. Studies have shown that women on a high-fiber diet have lower levels of circulating estrogen. More fiber in your diet means less circulating estrogen and reduced body congestion because excess estrogen is excreted through the bowel. Having an apple or pear every day keeps your system free flowing.

Finally, maintaining a healthy weight is another key to reduce fibroids and prevent their recurrence. Fat is a storage depot for hormones and wastes that fuel fibroid growth.

To Life-long Health,

Linda Page

Do you have Fibroids or Endometriosis

Fibroids and endometriosis are two of the biggest health complaints I hear about from women. There is hardly a week that goes by that I don't get an office call or a letter from a woman who is trying to avoid fibroid surgery or who is looking for relief. I decided to write this article in response to all of these wonderful women. It offers suggestions for safe and gentle natural therapies, like diet and whole herbs, that you may want to explore with your holistic physician or natural health practitioner. At Crystal Star, we always suggest you consult with health professional before starting a self-help program. The incidence of fibroids and endometriosis has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. More than a half million American women have hysterectomies every year because of complications caused by fibroids and endometriosis. As much as 40% of American women 35 and older have fibroids. Some data suggest uterine fibroids are more common than blue eyes.

Having a hysterectomy is major surgery, sometimes requiring a month or more of recovery time. A 2000 study in the journal Lancet shows women who have undergone hysterectomies have a 60% greater risk for urinary incontinence later in life. In addition, a hysterectomy induces a premature, unnatural menopause with all of its attendant problems- hot flashes, bone loss, weight gain, and mood swings. Most women tell me they would rather deal with the fibroids! The medical community's answer to this is usually a prescription of hormone replacement drugs that we now know are linked to breast cancer, gallbladder disease and blood clots.

The majority of these problems could have been avoided. The latest research shows that only 10% of hysterectomies are medically necessary.

What are Fibroids?

Uterine fibroids are benign growths between the size of a walnut and orange that appear on or within uterine walls. Their symptoms can be mild to severe with excessive menstrual bleeding, abdominal pain, bladder infections, painful intercourse and infertility topping the list. Further, most fibroids are not cancerous, and, according to some estimates, have less than 1/2 of 1% chance of becoming cancerous before menopause. In fact, research suggests most fibroids go away on their own after menopause.

Breast fibroids are also highly common. Breast fibroids feel like moveable, rubbery nodules near the surface of the breast. Women complain they cause swelling and that getting a hug is too painful. In a small number of cases, breast fibroids can be fast-growing and may require medical treatment. Even then, you should know that a recent study in National Cancer institute shows radiologists report false positives 16% of the time. Click here for more Breast Fibroids information.

How is Endometriosis Different? Endometriosis is caused by excess growth of endometrial tissue that is not shed during menstruation. The tissue escapes the uterus and spreads, attaching to other areas of the body- ovaries, lymph nodes, fallopian tubes, bladder, rectum, even kidneys and lungs. It grows abnormally, bleeding severely during the menstrual cycle, from the vagina or rectum, or bladder or back through the fallopian tubes, instead of normally through the vagina.

Endometriosis can mean heavy periods and pain all month long, and it increases risk for benign uterine and breast fibroids. It's credited with up to 50% of infertility cases in American women.

In many cases, natural therapies can help a woman's body normalize naturally. Further, symptoms of fibroids and endometriosis can be reduced by making simple diet changes and following specific herb and supplement protocols.

Do You Have Warning Signs Of Fibroids Or Endometriosis?

A visit to your holistic physician will give you a definitive diagnosis, but two or more yes answers to the symptoms below should alert you of a potential problem.

  • Severe abdominal cramping and shooting pain; and abdominal-rectal pain
  • Excessive, painful menstruation; passing large clots; prolonged abnormal menstrual cycles
  • Chronic fluid retention, abdominal bloating
  • Irregular bowel movements or diarrhea during menses
  • Urinary frequency
  • Sensation of fullness or pressure in the abdomen

To Life-long health,

Linda Page